Roasted Lemon Pepper Chicken, Walnut Parsley Dressing, and Gravy’d Root Vegetables

roasted lemon pepper chicken, walnut parsley dressing, and gravy’d root vegetables

serves: 5
cost per serving: $11.15

1 3 lb. Marin Sun Farms whole chicken
1 stick of butter
salt
pepper
1 c. chicken stock
¼-⅓  c. sprouted wheat flour
1 yellow onion
3 purple carrots
1 bunch baby carrots
1 celery root
7 ruby crescent fingerling potatoes
3 parsnips
1 lb. jerusalem artichokes
4 red and white cipollini onions
2 shallots
1 c. raw walnuts
1 bunch parsley
2 meyer lemons
1 garlic clove
olive oil

rinse chicken and pat dry with paper towels. take ½ tsp of salt per lb, rub chicken on all sides. put chicken on a plate and let sit in the fridge for 1-4 days. the night before you make the chicken put walnuts in a large bowl and fill with filtered water. take chicken out of fridge and let come to room temperature (this should take about an hour). preheat oven to 350˚F. scrub root vegetables clean. butter chicken on all sides. sprinkle cracked black pepper over chicken. take a roasting pan with rack, put a little chicken stock in the bottom of the pan. turn rack upside down and place chicken on top. put in the oven and set the timer for 20 minutes. zest lemons. chop zest into very tiny pieces, add some cracked black pepper, stir together with a fork and set aside. chop carrot tops off and set aside for another use (see note). chop purple carrots and fingerling potatoes into bite sized rounds. cut celery root in half, slice off the tops, bottoms, and the rest of the skin.  cut into ½” strips, then chop into little cubes. cut tops and bottoms off of parsnips, slice in half lengthwise and then into quarters, chop these strips into small chunks. remove tops and bottoms of cipollini onions by carving out a cone shape with a paring knife. cut ends off of shallots. peel onions. cut shallots in half so they are the same size rounds as the cipollini onions. chop jerusalem artichokes into chunks. after the chicken has cooked for the first 20 minutes, pull out of the oven, and remove rack and chicken. scrape up bits from the bottom of the pan and whisk to get a smoother consistency. cut about 1½ tbs of butter into small cubes. add chopped root vegetables to pan, stir. top with salt, pepper, and butter cubes. put back in the oven, set the timer for 20 minutes. remove parsley leaves from stems. discard stems. chop parsley. strain soaked walnuts, rinse well (see note). put walnuts, parsley, juice of 1 lemon, olive oil, pressed garlic clove, salt, and pepper in a food processor. blend until smooth. set aside.  when the timer goes off baste the chicken, stir the vegetables and remove most of the juice from the pan and let cool. top chicken with lemon zest and pepper mixture and put chicken and vegetables back in the oven for another 20 minutes. dice yellow onion very small. take a medium sized pot and heat over a med-high heat. when the pot is hot add a decent amount of butter. when the butter is melted add the diced onion and some salt and pepper. cook until the onion is clear and almost mushy, stirring often. meanwhile, take the cooled pan juice and mix with some sprouted wheat flour. add to onions, allow to start bubbling and then lower the heat to a simmer. whisk for about 10 minutes, until gravy starts to thicken. pull chicken out of the oven and let sit for 10 to 15 minutes to lock in all the juices. pour gravy over root vegetables and throw back in the oven for another 15-20 minutes.

baby carrots, celery root, ruby crescent fingerling potatoes, parsnip, purple carrots, jerusalem artichokes, shallots, red and white cipollini onions

butter chicken on all sides

take a roasting pan with rack

turn rack upside down

place chicken on top, put in the oven and set the timer for 20 minutes

zest lemons

chop zest into very tiny pieces, add some cracked black pepper, stir together with a fork and set aside

chop carrot tops off and set aside for another use (see note)

chop purple carrots into bite sized rounds

chop fingerling potatoes into bite sized rounds

cut celery root in half, slice off the tops and bottoms

slice off the rest of the skin

cut into ½” strips

then chop into little cubes

cut tops and bottoms off of parsnips, slice in half lengthwise and then into quarters, chop these strips into small chunks

remove tops and bottoms of cipollini onions by carving out a cone shape with a paring knife

cut ends off of shallots, peel onions, cut shallots in half so they are the same size rounds as the cipollini onions

chop jerusalem artichokes into chunks

after the chicken has cooked for the first 20 minutes, pull out of the oven, and remove rack and chicken

scrape up bits from the bottom of the pan and whisk to get a smoother consistency

cut about 1½ tbs of butter into small cubes

add chopped root vegetables to pan, stir, top with salt, pepper, and butter cubes, put back in the oven, set the timer for 20 minutes

be sure to rinse soaked walnuts well (see note)

put walnuts in a food processor

add chopped parsley, lemon juice, olive oil, salt, and pepper

add some garlic

blend until smooth, set aside

dice yellow onion very small

take a medium sized pot and heat over a med-high heat, when the pot is hot add a decent amount of butter, when the butter is melted add the diced onion and some salt and pepper

cook until the onion is clear and almost mushy, stirring often

meanwhile, take the cooled pan juice

mix with some sprouted wheat flour

add to onions, allow to start bubbling and then lower the heat to a simmer, whisk for about 10 minutes, until gravy starts to thicken

pull chicken out of the oven and let sit for 10 to 15 minutes to lock in all the juices

roasted lemon pepper chicken, root vegetables, and walnut parsley dressing

nutritional value:

chicken:
good source of the trace mineral selenium. selenium is of fundamental importance to human health. it is an essential component of several major metabolic pathways, including thyroid hormone metabolism, antioxidant defense systems, and immune function.

salt:
rids the body of carbon dioxide. aids in digestion. balances body’s acid-alkaline level. stimulates the liver. critical for preserving the serotonin and melatonin levels in the brain. vital for sleep regulation and bone structure.

pepper:
aids in digestion and relieves gas. anti-inflammatory. protects the liver. antioxidant and antibacterial.

chicken stock:
aids digestion. acts as a protein sparer, allowing the body to more fully utilize the complete proteins that are taken in. helps prevent and mitigate infectious disease.

wheat:
stimulates the liver to cleanse itself of toxins. good for the heart. when prepared properly, is a cancer inhibitor.

onion:
fights infection. antibiotic. keeps blood vessels free of clots. relaxes bronchial muscle. contains the potent anticancer bioflavonoid quercetin, which is not destroyed by cooking. helps to remove heavy metals and parasites from the gastrointestinal tract. cleanses the system of urea and sodium. prevents tooth decay.

carrots:
one of the best detoxifiers. alkalizing, cleansing, nourishing, and stimulating to almost every system in the body. sloughs off morbid wastes. rebuilds healthy cells. one of the best foods for the liver and digestive tract. good for the eyes and vision. it’s pectin reduces blood cholesterol levels.

celery root:
high in fiber, potassium, magnesium, and vitamin B6. according to Chinese medicine, it reduces high blood pressure.

potatoes:
raw potatoes, contain a sugary carbohydrate that is readily digested and enters the bloodstream slowly to provide the constant energy we need. when potatoes are cooked in any manner except steaming, the value of the mineral elements and most of the vitamins are lost, and the sugars are converted into starchy carbohydrates, which leave and acid end product in the process of digestion. steamed potatoes retain the most vitamins and minerals and are still strongly alkaline. fried in fat, potatoes are not only indigestible, but also have a tendency to reek havoc on the liver and gallbladder.

parsnips:
hold a specific affinity toward the kidneys, stomach, and spleen. are helpful in conditions of bladder and kidney stones. loaded with more food energy than most common vegetables, they help detoxify and cleanse the body. improves bowel action.

jerusalem artichokes:
high in potassium, magnesium, and iron. one of the best sources of inulin. inulin is a type of starch that is broken down by your body different than other starches, it helps keep blood sugar stable, and as such are beneficial for individuals with diabetes. inulin also supports healthy bacteria in your stomach and colon.

walnuts:
a warming and laxative food used to strengthen the kidneys and lungs. lubricates the large intestine. improves metabolism.

parsley:
facilitates oxygen metabolism. cleanses the blood. dissolves sticky deposits in the veins. maintains elasticity of blood vessels. helps to remove kidney stones and gallstones. stimulates adrenal sections.

lemon:
contains potassium which strengthens and energizes the heart, calcium which strengthens and builds the lungs, sodium which encourages tissue building, magnesium which acts as a blood alkalizer. it aids in detoxification of the liver and gallbladder. most of the vitamin C in citrus is in the zest, so always use it.

garlic:
one of the most beneficial foods for the digestive system. aids in the elimination of noxious waste matter and toxic heavy metals from the body. boosts immunological functions. purifies the blood stream by removing sticky inorganic deposits in the blood vessels. regularizes the action of the liver and gallbladder.

olive oil:
easily digested, imparts a generally soothing and healing influence to the digestive tract. beneficial for the gallbladder and liver. strengthens and develops body tissue and bones. a general tonic for the nerves.

notes:
Carrot tops are something that most people discard, but they are actually very nutritious. They are an excellent source of chlorophyll, the green pigment that combats tumor growth. Chlorophyll also contains cleansing properties that purify the blood, adrenal glands, and lymph nodes. They can be juiced, cooked in an egg scramble, added to soups, and the little tender leaves can be added raw to salads.
Soaking nuts and seeds is a very healthy practice. All nuts and seeds naturally contain enzyme inhibitors. By soaking them overnight you not only get rid of the toxic enzyme inhibitors, but increase the life and vitality contained within them. The purpose of these enzyme inhibitors is to protect the nut or seed until it has what it needs for growing (i.e. sunlight, water, soil, etc.). Since the soak water will contain the enzyme inhibitors, which are very acidic to the body, make sure to rinse your nuts and seeds well after soaking.

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